The Romane Historie… Also. The Breviaries of L. Florus: with a …
The Romane Historie… Also. The Breviaries of L. Florus: with a …
The Romane Historie… Also. The Breviaries of L. Florus: with a …
The Romane Historie… Also. The Breviaries of L. Florus: with a …
The Romane Historie… Also. The Breviaries of L. Florus: with a …
The Romane Historie… Also. The Breviaries of L. Florus: with a …

LIVY. The Romane Historie… Also. The Breviaries of L. Florus: with a Chronologie to the whole Historie: and the Topographie of Rome in old time. Translated ….

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From the library of a king-in-waiting

LIVY. The Romane Historie… Also. The Breviaries of L. Florus: with a Chronologie to the whole Historie: and the Topographie of Rome in old time. Translated out of Latine into English, by Philemon Holland, Doctor in Physicke. Adam Islip. 1600.

Folio. Contemporary full calf with gilt lozenges, borders and devices of fleur-de-lys with crowns to sides, sometime sympathetically rebacked and ties renewed, spine with gilt raised bands, centre tools and black morocco gilt lettering piece; pp. [10] + 1-804, 809-1351, 1354-1403, [43], woodcut to title page, woodcut portrait of Elizabeth I to verso of title page, woodcut portrait of Livy on verso of A4, woodcut head- and tail-pieces and initials throughout; occasional ink marginalia, a little browning mainly to margins, paper repairs to bottom corners of first three leaves not affecting text, generally very good. Provenance: attributed to the library of Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales (1594 - 1612), the eldest son of James I who would have succeeded to the throne instead of Charles I had he not died at the age of 18 of typhoid fever. He was considered to be a promising king-in-waiting and was known for his academic brilliance. He amassed a library of more than 1000 books, many of which were stamped with the same fleur-de-lys and crown device as we see on this binding (see stamps 14, 15, 23 and 29 at https://armorial.library.utoronto.ca/stamp-owners/HEN004).
First edition of the first complete translation of Livy into English. Philemon Holland was one of the foremost translators of the time and showed a great facility in rendering the Latin into accessible English. His later edition of Pliny was one of Shakespeare's sources for Othello and Kenneth Muir, in The Sources of Shakespeare's Plays (1977), suggests that Book 2 of Holland's Livy could have been partly behind Coriolanus. The Livy was his first published translation. "Holland claimed to have written the whole manuscript with the same pen—‘a monumental pen,’ says Fuller, which ‘he solemnly kept,’ and which ultimately was enclosed in silver by a lady of his acquaintance" (ODNB). Holland's Livy later became an important text during the English Civil War for constitutional theorists such as Sir Francis Nethersole, Leveller polemicists and Royalist pamphleteers because of the book's multi-faceted descriptions of the transition of the Roman monarchy to a consular republic. That makes the association with the deposed king's elder brother even more piquant.
Pforzheimer 495; STC 16613.

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