A tour to Sheeraz, by the Route of Kazroon and Feerozabad
A tour to Sheeraz, by the Route of Kazroon and Feerozabad

WARING, Edward Scott. A tour to Sheeraz, by the Route of Kazroon and Feerozabad; with various Remarks on the Manners, Customs, Laws, Language, and Literature of the Persian…

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WARING, Edward Scott. A tour to Sheeraz, by the Route of Kazroon and Feerozabad; with various Remarks on the Manners, Customs, Laws, Language, and Literature of the Persians. To which is added a History of Persia, from the Death of Kureem Khan to the subversion of the Zund Dynasty. London, T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1807.

4to. Entirely uncut in the original publisher's boards with remnants of printed label to spine (restored), in a custom-made drop-back box; pp. xiii, [3], 329, engraved frontispiece and one further plate, printing in Arabic letters in the text; half-title, frontispiece and title a little toned and spotted, pp. 237/8 with marginal spotes, otherwise a rather clean and crisp copy; 1820s presentation inscription to title.
First published in Mumbai in 1804, this is the largely improved, corrected and only obtainable edition of a thorough description of Persian society and history, inluding the Gulf and manners and customs af the neighboring Arabian-speaking countries. Edward Scott Waring (1783-1821) was Bengal civil servant who had written this book in Poona after travelling in Persia as a gentleman with ten servants, tents, a cook, all mounted on horses and mules. He visits dignitaries, describes the ancient ruins and keenly observes the organization of society and customs, material culture, pastimes, literature and music of the people. Waring deals as well with Persian trade on the Gulf, travels to, and describes Basra (12 pages). One chapter is early account of Muhammad ibn 'Abd al-Wahhab and Wahhabi Islam, recent wars of the Wahhabis against Persians, Basra, Bahrain and excursions into Norther Iraq. ' The force of the Wuhabees is very considerable, probably eighty or ninety thousand; and as their expeditions are conducted with great celerity and secrecy, they keep all the neighbouring countries in perpetual apprehension. When I was in Bassora, the people were in expectation of being attacked … Since finishing this, intelligence has been received of their having atttacked and plundered Tyeef, Mecca, and Medina … Our speculations, on the probable effects of this event might be carried to a great length …' (p. 124). Other chapters are on the horses of the Arabs and Persians, date production, and the Persian army.

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