The Crescent and the Cross; Or, Romance and Realities of Eastern
The Crescent and the Cross; Or, Romance and Realities of Eastern

WARBURTON, Eliot. The Crescent and the Cross; Or, Romance and Realities of Eastern Travel … Third Edition.

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WARBURTON, Eliot. The Crescent and the Cross; Or, Romance and Realities of Eastern Travel … Third Edition. London, Henry Colburn, 1845.

Two volumes, 8vo. Original publisher's purple ribbed cloth, ornamented in blind lettered and decorated in gilt; pp. xvi, 360; v, 342, [6], 8 (advertisements), two tinted lithographic frontispieces and several wood-engraved vignettes; spines faded, otherwise a very good set.
Early edition. Warburton made an extensive tour of Syria, Egypt and Palestine in 1843. The Crescent and The Cross was subsequently first published in 1845 and received great critical and popular acclaim, being printed in numerous editions. One of the other most popular travel accounts of the period, Eothen (see item ) was dedicated to Warburton by Kinglake, a life-long friend. Over 50 pages at the beginning of volume II are dedicated to Lebanon. - All early two-volume editions, especially those published in the year of the first printing are very rare.
Together with: Signed autograph letter by the author on black-margined stationery. Lynmouth, July 5, 1848
Small 8vo. 3 pages; previously folded and mounted (traces of glue to final, blank, page), very light toning in places.
A decorative autograph by the Irish writer, who is reknowned for above book. He was born in 1810 in Aughrim, County Galway, admitted to the Inner Temple in 1832 and to the King's Inn, Dublin, in 1833; however soon retired to travel and write. In this letter, written at the Warburton's Devon retreat, he expresses interest in obtaining access to some manuscript material on the Civil War 1640-1650, which had such a devastating effect on Irish society and economy. The last book Warburton planned and started to research would have been on poverty in Dublin, which did not come to fruition; however, during his last visit to Ireland he gathered material on the subject. He died on board a ship during a fire in 1852.
Blackmer 1771 (first edition).

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