Bekanntmachung ... Die Königl. Bayer. Polizei-Direktion München theilt dem hiesigen Magistrate …

[LOLA MONTEZ]. Bekanntmachung ... Die Königl. Bayer. Polizei-Direktion München theilt dem hiesigen Magistrate offiziell mit, daß die Gräfin Landsfeld, nachdem sie ge….

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[LOLA MONTEZ]. Bekanntmachung ... Die Königl. Bayer. Polizei-Direktion München theilt dem hiesigen Magistrate offiziell mit, daß die Gräfin Landsfeld, nachdem sie gestern die Haupt= und Residenzstadt München verlassen, heute Vormittags 11 Uhr von Pasing aus in Begleitung zweier Polizei-Bediensteter auf der Eisenbahn nach Lindau abgereist ist ... Munich, February 12, 1848.

Foolscap folio, broadside in black letter on laid paper; previously folded with one faint spot; well-preserved and fresh.
This proclamation announces the expulsion of one of the most famous impostors, dancers, adventuresses and liberated women of the 19th century. She came to Munich, where her conduct and open affair with the ageing King Ludwig I had become the catalyst of the 1848 revolution in Bavaria.
'King Ludwig created her countess of Landsfeld on 25 August 1847, when his initial platonic interest had become frankly erotic, although Montez usually rewarded his desires with frustration. As countess she became even more arrogant, establishing a corps of university students to act as her bodyguard and undermining the new cabinet until it too was replaced. The final crisis began on 9 February 1848, when Montez attempted to defy a mob attacking her student corps and was saved from assassination only by the arrival of troops. Two days later she fled Munich as an enraged mob stormed her villa. She ultimately found refuge in Switzerland, where she corresponded with King Ludwig, encouraging him to abdicate and join her. Depressed by her absence and the concessions forced from him by the revolutionary events of 1848, King Ludwig did abdicate on 19 March 1848' (Oxford DNB). This broadside is signed by the recently appointed minister of war, Mark, who had told the King that he would rather shoot himself than use the army to protect the increasingly unpopular dancer. Further signatures in print are that of the mayor of Munich and his secretary. 'This is made public to counteract diverse rumors,' they state. And more than rumours were to follow, as Lola managed to return to Munich disguised as a man in March and met the King.
We were only able to locate two copies, both in the Municipal Museum of Munich.

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