Whitewashing Julia.  An Original  Comedy in Three Acts
Whitewashing Julia.  An Original  Comedy in Three Acts
Whitewashing Julia.  An Original  Comedy in Three Acts

JONES, Henry Arthur. Whitewashing Julia. An Original Comedy in Three Acts.

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Inscribed to Edith Evans.

JONES, Henry Arthur. Whitewashing Julia. An Original Comedy in Three Acts. Privately Printed not for circulation at the Chiswick Press. 1903.

8vo., sometime finely bound in full red morocco, boards with single gilt line panel and corner star tools, spine lettered and panelled in gilt, lower board with gilt bee tool, all edges gilt, marbled endpapers. A very good copy.
First edition. Inscribed by Jones to Edith Evans "Dear Miss Edith Evans, With great admiration for your splendid gifts, and hoping they may continue to meet with recognition from playgoers and critics, I am cordially yours, Henry Arthur Jones Sept 26th '27. These privately printed old Chiswick Plays are beginning to be valued by the booksellers on account of the fine printing, no longer now to be obtained in an age when Democracy is coming into its own, to the great discomfort of us all".
From the library of Edith Evans's with her posthumous bookplate, thence from her biographer, the film director and actor Bryan Forbes with his bookplate.
Henry Arthur Jones may best be remembered for the description of his writing by Oscar Wilde, "There are three rules for writing plays. The first rule is not to write like Henry Arthur Jones; the second and third rules are the same." He was nonetheless a successful playwright with a long line of plays and comedies, ranging in type from the phenomenally popular melodrama, "The Silver King," through the tense drama of "Mrs. Dane's Defense," the beautiful and moving tragedy of "Michael and His Lost Angel," and the idealistic "The Divine Gift," to the high and sophisticated comedy, "The Liars."
In the 1920s he began to write political essays and engaged in attacks on both Bernard Shaw and H.G. Wells. The inscription in this book gives a keen insight into his political standpoint, but it is somewhat curious in the context of the fulsome and complimentary inscription to Edith Evans who had created leading roles for many of Bernard Shaw's plays.

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