Proceedings In The Island of Guernsey, relative to the Dismissal of …

[GUERNSEY] BAYLY, Major General. Proceedings In The Island of Guernsey, relative to the Dismissal of Colonel Guille, from the command of the North or 1st Light infantry Regiment of Mi….

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[GUERNSEY] BAYLY, Major General. Proceedings In The Island of Guernsey, relative to the Dismissal of Colonel Guille, from the command of the North or 1st Light infantry Regiment of Militia. Guernsey: Printed At The Stanhope-Press, by H. Brouard, Bordage-Street. 1819-1820.

8vo. Plain blue wrappers stitched to spine; pp. [iii], iv-viii + 42, [43-44], 45-53; light external dusting, small creasing to corners, slight indentations from pencil marks to upper panel, internally clean and crisp with some horizontal rucking.
First edition, with preface dated 30th June 1819. An official account and document relating to the dismissal of John Guille, Esq. from the command of the 1st or North Light Infantry Regt. Of Guernsey Militia, followed by "Second appendix, containing His Majesty's order in council restoring Colonel Guille to the command of the North or 1st Light Infantry Regiment of Militia, with other documents relating thereto", with sequential pagination. The work contains letters and orders signed by J.M. Doyle; P. Bradhafft; John Guille; H. Bayly and others.
An important episode in the life of John Guille (1788-1853), described in one obituary as a 'thorough Guernseyman' who accepted the responsibilities of public life using judgement and discretion to earn 'an honourable place in the annals of this island'. The Guille family history on Guernsey dates back to the time of William the Conqueror. John Guille was the eldest son of William Guille, Esq. and Rachel, daughter of Charles Andros, Esq., of the Piques. He was brought up by his grandfather (also John Guille) when orphaned at a young age. On 24th April 1805, at just 17 years, he became Captain in the 2nd, or North Regiment of Militia, and was promoted to Colonel in 1811. In 1818 he was relieved of that commission by Governor Bayly, for perceived financial irregularities, but was reinstated by the Prince regent the following year. In 1830 he was promoted to a new post (created by King William the Fourth) of Aide-de-Camp to the Sovereign in Guernsey. In 1810 John Guille was elected Jurat of the Royal Court and, between 1835 and 1842, he held the position of Lieutenant-Bailiff. In 1842 he was appointed Bailiff, a post he performed with distinction until undermined by General Napier who usurped his role. Guille's health suffered from this slight and he died shortly afterwards in Plymouth.

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