The Bedouin of the Euphrates … Edited, with a preface, and some

BLUNT, Lady Anne. The Bedouin of the Euphrates … Edited, with a preface, and some Account of the Arabs and their Horses by W[ilfrid] S[cawen] B[lunt].

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BLUNT, Lady Anne. The Bedouin of the Euphrates … Edited, with a preface, and some Account of the Arabs and their Horses by W[ilfrid] S[cawen] B[lunt]. New York, Harper, 1879.

8vo. Original dark green pictorial cloth with bevelled edges; pp. 445, [3], colour-printed folding map and plates in wood-engraving with tissue guards, folding genealogical table of Arab thorough-breds; light wear to corners, inner hinges strengthened; apart from light even toning a good copy of a scarce work.
First US edition. Lady Anne Blunt was Lord Byron's gand-daughter, traveller and horse breeder. The Blunts 'travelled extensively in the Middle East: her scientific interests are manifest in the mass of aneroid readings, barometric pressures, and compass bearings in her journal entries of their travels in the Arabian deserts. There she found happiness, and her numerous journals give a fascinating account of their experiences. Written simply as a private daily record, they provide frank insights into every aspect of her life, including her views on the political events in which her husband was involved. They also reveal a woman of remarkable courage and endurance. She converted to Roman Catholicism as a result of a vision experienced when Blunt lay seriously ill in a remote spot during a journey in 1879. She was one of very few women of her time to travel into the heart of the desert. The Blunts undertook three long journeys, on horseback, taking only a few Arab servants with camels. Her artistic talent is evident in her sketches: whether of desert scenes, Arabs and their animals, town dwellings, or ruined forts, they were executed meticulously … It was largely her money that funded the Blunts' travels and the stud they started in 1878. That year, through the British consul in Aleppo, they met Arab sheikhs of famed horse-breeding tribes, and decided to buy Arabian stallions and mares to found a stud in England' (ODNB).

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