WATSON, Malcolm. The Prevention of Malaria in the Federated Malay States. A Record of twenty Years' Progress . . . With Contributions by P. S. Hunter and A. R. Welling…

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WATSON, Malcolm. The Prevention of Malaria in the Federated Malay States. A Record of twenty Years' Progress . . . With Contributions by P. S. Hunter and A. R. Wellington. And a Preface by Sir Ronald Ross . . . Second edition - revised and enlarged. London, Murray, 1921.

8vo. Original blue cloth, lettered in gilt; pp. xxvii, [3], 381, [4, advertisements], plates after photographs; one corner bumped, spine faded otherwise good; provenance: contemporary stamp of the Georgian Red Cross to verso of initial plate and elsewhere.
Substantailly enlarged edition (first, Liverpool, 1911, pp. 139). 'Within a few months of its publication by the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine in 1911, the first edition of this book was sold out. A reprint was suggested, but as our knowledge at that time was increasing rapidly, I felt the book should be re-written . . . . Visits to Sumatra, Panama, and British Guiana, the writing of Rural sanitation in the Tropics, and the war, have all served to delay the issue of a new edition; but another, and perhaps the chief cause, was a disinclination to write during the progress of many anti-malaria schemes, and before they had reached fruition – in other words, a dislike to write of uncompleted work' (p. xiii). Apart from malaria prevention efforts the book give insightful details of the infrastructure, population, and the health system of the country.
'At the turn of the century the Federated Malay states were then in a phase of rapid development. Devastating epidemics of malaria were an inevitable sequel, including around the town of Klang where in January 1901 Watson took up his duties as district surgeon. Inspired by Ronald Ross, who had proved that malaria was carried by mosquitoes, Watson embarked on a vigorous programme of mosquito control. His success was a landmark in preventive medicine. Henceforth malaria and its prevention were Watson's lifelong interests' (ODNB).
Provenance: The Caucasian Soveit Republic of Georgia had serious malaria problems, which accounts for the provenance.