Russian Embassies to the Georgian Kings (1589-1605) ... Edited with Introduction, Additional

ALLEN, William Edward David (editor). Russian Embassies to the Georgian Kings (1589-1605) ... Edited with Introduction, Additional Notes, Commentaries and Bibliography by W.E.D. Allen. Tex…

Regular price
£90.00
Sale price
£90.00
Tax included. Shipping calculated at checkout.

ALLEN, William Edward David (editor). Russian Embassies to the Georgian Kings (1589-1605) ... Edited with Introduction, Additional Notes, Commentaries and Bibliography by W.E.D. Allen. Texts translated by Anthony Mango. Cambridge: Robert MacLehose & Company Limited, published for the Hakluyt Society at the University Press, 1970.

8vo (217 x 137mm), 2 volumes. Original blue cloth, upper boards with Society's device in gilt and blind-ruled borders, spines lettered in gilt, dustwrappers, retaining prices; pp. I: xxxii, 1-368; II: ix, [1 (blank)], 369-640, [6 (blank)]; colour-printed frontispieces, 3 colour-printed plates, 9 plates, and 2 plates with illustrations recto-and-verso, one colour-printed map, 6 folding maps, and one full-page map in the text; dustwrappers very slightly rubbed and creased at edges, a few very small, light marks, one map with very short marginal tear, nonetheless a very good set.
First edition. 2nd series, nos 138 and 139. A compilation of documents and commentaries relating to the Embassies of Zvenigorodski and Antonov (1589-1590), Tatishchev and Ivanov (1604-1605), and Sovin and Polukhanov (1596-1599): 'By the early sixteenth century the loosely knit kingdom of Georgia had disintegrated from the strong monarchy of the middle ages to a number of small states and principalities. This internal disunity made the Georgians easy victims of the power politics of the neighbouring Ottoman and Safavid empires, and by the end of the century the southward drive of the Russians intensified the struggle for military and diplomatic control over the whole of the Caucasian isthmus. As a result of this struggle seventeen embassies were exchanged between the Russian tsars and Georgian kings ruling in Kakheti during the years 1564-1605 [...] Although the writers seem to be frequently pre-occupied with questions of protocol, their observations give a clear picture both of current Russian administrative and diplomatic practice and of the life and customs of the peoples of the Caucasus and Georgia' (dustwrapper blurb).
Compassing the Vaste Globe of the Earth, 2/138-139.

#2065843